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UPDATE: Divers find boy's body in mine pit lake

CES: Envisioning the future today

Owned and managed by the Consumer Technology Association, the annual CES show brings 170,000 people to the event with 3,900 exhibitors. The multi-day event is described as the world’s gathering place for all who thrive on the business of consumer technologies. Photo from CES1 / 3
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Michael Moroni3 / 3

ThinQ, LG's new artificial intelligence, was the rave at their conference at the CES show in Las Vegas.

ThinQ is an ecosystem in which all of your devices talk to each other. And, just like our cute little Jibo, an expressive robot described as the world's first social robot, LG is bringing to market CLOi, an almost-like butler for your home. Ask her your upcoming schedule, and she will recognize a sporting event, and recommend washing your clothes before the event, and that she has already set the washing machine for the correct settings. When the wash is done, the washer automatically communicates to the dryer on the settings it needs. And CLOi will announce to you the wash is done; reminding you to swap to the dryer. Ask CLOi to turn the temperature down, and she can do that as well.

Owned and managed by the Consumer Technology Association, the annual CES show brings 170,000 people to the event with 3,900 exhibitors. The multi-day event is described as the world's gathering place for all who thrive on the business of consumer technologies, drawing people from 150 countries. Exhibits look at all aspects of technology—used in medicine, transportation, communication, entertainment, sports, augmented and virtual reality—affecting work and home. Companies showcase what is in the immediate future and provide a look at what the future could hold.

In the TV scene, they are boasting a huge improvement on picture quality, marketing pictures yet even more life-like.

And the last items LG showcased were its service robots. There was a delivery robot, which a hotel could benefit from. The robot could have items loaded into it, such as a newspaper, and deliver to the guest at their room. Next was a servicing robot, with which food could be handled and delivered to guests at participating restaurants.

And the third was a shopping robot. While it doesn't quite shop for you, it can follow you around, and when you select items to place in your cart, you can scan the barcode. The robot will act just like a self-checkout register, giving you your totals, and allowing you to check out as soon as you load your last item.

LG's conference did have some issues however. CLOi became unresponsive pretty much after her first demo, even though they tried to use her a few times afterwards. And some of their product demo videos—seemed a bit off.

Monster Products, a leading manufacturer of high-performance cables, had a very interesting press conference. While it had a much smaller venue than LG's, it had a comedic feeling to it. The "Head Monster," Noel Lee, was very energetic on stage. The conference itself seemed a little ad-libbed, and didn't feel like it had a ton of structure. Nonetheless, it didn't stop them from some interesting and cool products being announced, such as new Bluetooth speakers that are not only waterproof, but they float. Something that, with our high concentration of lakes, may be very interesting to us here.

They also had a guest appearance by hip-hop musical artist Iggy Azalea. As a new brand ambassador, she was excited that Monster is creating some specific earbuds that have a more feminine look to them, marketing them more as accessories to still enjoy great sound versus bulky headphones.

Joe Perry, from the band Aerosmith, made a guest appearance as well, as a brand ambassador. He was touting a new boombox, in both a mini and a large size, that has been specifically tuned for classic rock by Perry. He claims that he uses these Monster boomboxes to lay back songs from the recording studio to hear and make sure the song sounds great.

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