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Kari Frisch, a Central Lakes College instructor, uses social media as a tool for
Kari Frisch, a Central Lakes College instructor, uses social media as a tool for

CLC instructor uses technology to talk about world hunger

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lifestyles Brainerd, 56401

Brainerd MN 506 James St. / PO Box 974 56401

Central Lakes College speech instructor Kari Frisch is taking up to eight hours of non-teaching time over a six-week stretch in a commitment to combat local and global hunger.

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She is enrolled in the United Nations’ World Food Program/ONE class looking at global hunger issues and she has a blog entitled “Eleventh Hour Challenge” at http://serviceforclc.blogspot.com.

As part of the class she is taking, students were encouraged to create a project or hold an event focusing on advocacy of the hunger issue. Frisch created a project that has the potential for a large scope based on the power of social networks and viral philanthropy, which could mean thousands of people being helped across the United States and all over the world.

Among the web-based courses Frisch teaches are online social networking and service learning. Her online teaching and blogging skills mesh well with the volunteer initiative. She is engaging people in this cause by talking to them in person and using social media like Facebook and Twitter.

The Central Lakes College Food Shelf has already benefited, and Frisch reports a donor who dropped off food shelf items in her Wisconsin community.

To tie in with the eleventh-hour theme, she started with her own “Team11,” which includes 11 people who will take three steps: Play Freerice.com for the group TEAM11, donate nonperishable food to local food shelves; and challenge 11 other people with the three-step challenge.

On her blog, Service for CLC, Frisch provides details about the online Freerice.com trivia game leads to donations of rice for the United Nations’ World Food Program. She said it’s much easier than it sounds to play for 11 minutes or to a minimum of 1,100 grains of donated rice.

As of Nov. 3, more than 30 people had signed up to play Freerice. One-third are Frisch’s students, for whom it is not a mandatory assignment but rather an optional choice.

“We have raised 131,000 grains of rice so far,” she reported. The players range from elementary-age children to holders of doctoral degrees.

As a year-long project, the Daggett Drifters 4-H Club has signed up to continue the effort to keep food shelves stocked, and at least one local church participates by adding to its food shelf.

If playing Team11 at freerice.com, the directions and more information can be found at http://tinyurl.com/3dcdutb.

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