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What good is world trade?

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How does world trade help our country? I am not a politician, but I try to use common sense. I sense that our business transactions with other countries does not work and actually works against us. They bamboozle us by manipulating the dollar to their advantage.

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Our trade deficit is huge due to the manipulation of the dollar, plus the unequal import/export loss we are sacked with. We have little to trade as our representatives have allowed our once great manufacturing industry to be outsourced.

What has happened is a guess, but what is apparent to me is that our representatives are not only influenced by our highly paid lobbyists, but are guided by them. Why? I can only guess!

I don't like my guesses known but you can take a good guess also, and most likely we would be on the same track. I cannot fathom the thinking of our representatives when they first allowed outsourcing and they continue to do so.

Can they possibly believe we can buy almost everything necessary. How long can we continue to print money? We used to have to earn it with honest down to earth work.

Now we don't have to as apparently our leaders believe higher education for all of us is the answer.

The will of the people is being replaced by the will of their supposed representatives guided by lobbyists. Big money has taken control of our country, even elections are won with big money.

We need world trade like we need a hole in the head at least until we bring back our manufacturers thus giving us equal bargaining power.

Lobbyists are surely helpful somewhat, but the represent big business and care less about the people which are supposed to be represented by congressmen.

James Gordon

Brainerd<

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Sarah Nelson
Sarah Nelson joined the Brainerd Dispatch in April 2010 and works as a online reporter, content editor and staff writer. She is a world traveler, accused idealist and California native now braving the winters of Central Minnesota. She believes in the power of human resolve and hopes to be part of something that makes history by bringing an end to injustice in the world. Sarah has worked as a criminal background researcher, high school civics teacher, grant writer, and contributing writer with Causecast.org — tackling every issue from global poverty to bio-degradable bicycles. Her favorite thing about living in Minnesota is July. Sarah left the Brainerd Dispatch in April 2014.
(218) 855-5879
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