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Learn about woodland creatures, woods and water

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outdoors Brainerd, 56401

Brainerd MN 506 James St. / PO Box 974 56401

Minnesota landowners have the chance to learn how to manage small or large forests during a March workshop in Grand Rapids, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) said.

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The Up North Woodland Workshop is 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 9, at Itasca Community College.

“This will be a full day of presentations, discussions and questions and answers about Minnesota woods,” said Mimi Barzen, DNR forester. “The event is primarily for Minnesota family woodland owners, although others are also welcome.”

The aim is to provide information to help landowners sustainably manage small or large woodlands. Classes will offer information on hardwood forest management, forest resilience, recreational trails, wildlife, owls, geology and more.

“Private lands offer a tremendous public value in many ways,” Barzen said. “They provide habitat for wildlife, protect air and water quality, support rural economies and increase recreational opportunities.”

Four remote sites in Brainerd, Cloquet, Mankato and Rochester will offer a live interactive broadcast for those unable to attend the workshop in person. The sites will have a two-way audio and video feed in a classroom setting. People will be able to submit questions to speakers in Grand Rapids and discuss the presentations with other landowners. A University of Minnesota Extension forester will host the remote sessions.

Registration for people attending the workshop in Grand Rapids or at a remote location is $20 if postmarked by Feb. 27 and $25 if after. The fee covers workshop materials, refreshments and lunch.

There will be five sessions with four presentation options per session. Sign-up is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Find details on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/forestry/woodlandworkshop.

The workshop is sponsored by the DNR and University of Minnesota Extension.

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