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Girls pajamas recalled by Star Ride Kids due to violation of Federal Flammability Standard

This recall involves about 7,000 Star Ride Kids girl's pajama sets. The pajamas fail to meet federal flammability standards for children's sleepwear, posing a risk of burn injuries to children. The recalled pajamas are made of polyester and sold ...

This recall involves about 7,000 Star Ride Kids girl's pajama sets.

The pajamas fail to meet federal flammability standards for children’s sleepwear, posing a risk of burn injuries to children.

The recalled pajamas are made of polyester and sold in sizes 4 through 14.

The pajama sets consist of polar fleece pants with a bow and elastic at the waist and a jersey two-piece long-sleeve shirt. Style reference number 5217 or 5250 is on a label in the side seam of each shirt. “Star Ride Taking It To The Next Level” is on a label in the waistband of each pair of pants. The logo “Star Ride” is printed on the inside back of the neck of each shirt. Some shirts have a hangtag on the wrist with the words “flame resistant sleepwear.”

A detailed list of combinations for sets being recalled can be viewed here: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2015/Childrens-Pajamas-Recalled-by-Star-R...

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No incidents or injuries have been reported.

These pajama sets were sold at Children’s boutiques and department stores nationwide from August 2013 through November 2013 for between $10 and $13.

Consumers should immediately take the recalled pajamas away from children, stop using them and return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumer can contact Star Ride Kids toll-free at (866) 349-7094 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.starride.com and click on the Product Recall link on the bottom of the page for more information.

Consumer Product Safety Commission Recall Number: 15-057

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