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Lakes PROUD campaign seeks to keep millions in the region

A buy local campaign will take more shape this week with a Sept. 17 business event where organizers say they will show how the lakes region can keep $60 million.

Lakes PROUD is a buy local campaign with a "mission of growing the regional economy by creating an understanding that it matters were consumer and business dollars are spent."
Lakes PROUD is a buy local campaign with a "mission of growing the regional economy by creating an understanding that it matters were consumer and business dollars are spent."

A buy local campaign will take more shape this week with a Sept. 17 business event where organizers say they will show how the lakes region can keep $60 million.

Lakes PROUD is a collaboration of the Brainerd Lakes, Crosslake, Pequot Lakes, Cuyuna Lakes and Nisswa chambers of commerce.

"Success simply requires an unwavering belief that your money pays for much more than a single purchase," Lakes PROUD states on its website. "A few dollars may be just a drop in a the economic bucket but it still fills our bucket. And each drop can create positive ripples throughout our communities."

With 70,000 adults in Cass and Crow Wing counties, Lakes PROUD states, if all just changed one $50 monthly buying decision to support a local business, it would add up to $42 million to the regional economy annually. And Lakes PROUD reported if all of the 3,000 businesses in Cass and Crow Wing counties changed one $500 monthly buying decision to support other local businesses, it would add up to $18 million to the regional economy annually.

"That adds up to $60 million that could potentially stay in the lakes region," Lakes PROUD reported.

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The buy local business summit event begins with a 2 p.m. registration Sept. 17 at the Northern Pacific Center in Brainerd with a 2:30 p.m. welcome and introduction. Speakers include John Landsburg, Lakes PROUD chair; and Shawn Hansen, Nisswa Chamber of Commerce.

Keynote speaker at 2:45 p.m. is Joe Grafton, with the American Independent Business Alliance. Grafton is a partner at a mission-driven foodservice consulting practice. He serves as the treasurer of the board at the Sustainable Business Network of Massachusetts and chief operating officer of Together Boston, a seven-year-old music, art and technology festival.

In addition, the event includes a panel of local business owners. Panelists include: Scott Johnson, The Office Shop; Steve Mau, Brainerd General Rental; Chris Quisberg, Cub Foods; Anje Smith, AJ Business Development; Jenny Smith, Cycle Path & Paddle; Amy Swensen, Backyard Greenhouse; Biff Ulm, Zaiser's.

Lakes PROUD is seeking pledges to buy local. The event includes a regional business after hours at 4:30 p.m. and a 5 p.m. campaign launch. The event is expected to conclude by 6 p.m.

Cost is $10 per person for one or both the business summit and the regional business after hours. Refreshments will be served. Prairie Bay is catering the event. All proceeds benefit Lakes PROUD. Anyone is welcome to attend the event but organizers report businesses must be chamber members to participate in the Lakes PROUD campaign.

The Lakes PROUD Committee includes: John Landsburg, Landsburg's Landscape Nursery; Andrea Bauman, True Photography & Design; Tim Bogenschutz, Brainerd Dispatch; Joe Breiter, Widseth Smith Nolting; Jenna Crawford, Pequot Lakes Chamber; Bobby Hall, Guide Point Pharmacy; Shawn Hansen, Nisswa Chamber; Anita Hollenhorst, Brainerd Chamber; Jessica Holmvig, Cuyuna Chamber; Andy Isackson, Consolidated Telecommunications Co.; Johnna Johnson, Kava House; Matt Kilian, Brainerd Chamber; Kirstin Larsen, Charter/Spectrum Reach; Steve Mau, Brainerd General Rental; Cindy Myogeto, Crosslake Chamber; Chris Quisberg, Cub Foods; David Quisberg, Holiday Station; Phil Seibel, Brainerd Dispatch; Ben Thuringer, Madden's; Kristi Westbrock, CTC.

Related Topics: SMALL BUSINESS
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