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Progress: Lost Lake Lodge celebrates 70 years

Lost Lake Lodge on the Gull Lake Narrows has been part of the lakes for 70 years. Ray and Fran Schwartz began construction of Lost Lake Lodge in 1946, opening the restaurant that year. "A year later they opened the first two cabins on the resort....

Lost Lake Lodge on the Gull Lake Narrows has been part of the lakes for 70 years.

Ray and Fran Schwartz began construction of Lost Lake Lodge in 1946, opening the restaurant that year.

"A year later they opened the first two cabins on the resort. Over the course of the next 12 years they built 10 additional cabins, and by 1970 they had doubled the size of the dining room, added a recreation room, enlarged the beach, and added new docks," Lost Lake Lodge notes in its online history. A photo on its website shows a vintage sign sitting in sand next to a unpaved road with an arrow indicating Lost Lake Lodge was a little farther off the beaten path. The sign noted the resort offered the American plan, offered modern cottages and private lake with a dining room open to the public. Over the years, it's been the place where locals reported seeing famous faces, even an actor from a popular television series.

"When Bill and Ethelmae Carter bought the resort in 1970, they followed the same formula for success, welcoming old and new friends to the expanding lake resort," Lost Lake Lodge notes. "In 1987, when Tim and Cindy Moore took over, their commitment to preserving the natural setting drew more friends to the relaxed retreat. Doug and Pat Lewis brought their own touch, enhancing restaurant fare and adding dining that overlooks the Gull Lake Narrows. It's really no surprise the current owner, Rebound Hospitality, includes Brett Reese, whose family has gathered at Lost Lake for years."

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