PEQUOT LAKES -- The leadership of Pine Tree District, Central Minnesota Council, Boy Scouts of America announced the presentation of Eagle Scout to two local Scouts from Troop 102, Pequot Lakes American Legion.

Jack Benson and Erik Huseby were presented their Eagle Scout ranks at a court of honor Nov. 4 at the Pelican Lakes Conservation Club, Scoutmaster Chad Hansen reported in a news release.

Eagle Scout is the highest rank a Scout can earn as a member of a Scouts BSA Troop.

Both Huseby and Benson started their journey in Scouting in the first grade as Tiger Cubs in Pequot with Pack 102 and progressed through the program, earning their Arrow of Light as Cub Scouts and then becoming members of Troop 102.

Erik Huseby (left) and Jack Benson with their Eagle Scout ranks received at a Nov. 4 Court of Honor at Pelican Lake Conservation Club. Submitted photo
Erik Huseby (left) and Jack Benson with their Eagle Scout ranks received at a Nov. 4 Court of Honor at Pelican Lake Conservation Club. Submitted photo

For his Eagle project, Huseby built and installed six benches for the conservation club. Benson’s project was land restoration and tree planting at the Sibley Lake Park.

“I’ve been going to the park for eight to 10 years and it’s great to see the change and improvement to the community that my project has made,” said Benson in a news release.

Both Scouts commented on the great feeling they got as they saw their fellow Scouts and volunteers come together to help them accomplish their project.

For an Eagle Scout project, it is not about the Scout doing the work. The biggest point of the project, other than showing support for their community, is the Scout providing the leadership for the project. They are the driving force from the planning to the completion of the project. They must document how they came up with the plan for the project, how they are going to raise the necessary funds, who they are going to get to work on the project, when they are going to get the project done and then document each and every step of the project.

The Scout has from when they join the troop until their 18th birthday to earn Eagle Scout. They must earn all of the ranks leading up to the Eagle and, with that, they must earn 21 merit badges, 11 of which must come from the required Eagle list. They must be in a leadership position in their troop and live by the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives. The final step on their journey is appearing before a board of review at the district level and prove to the board that they have completed all of the requirements.

“My piece of advice for all the Scouts on the trail to Eagle is don’t wait to get this done,” said Huseby in a news release.

For more information about becoming a Scout, visit www.BSACMC.org