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Klobuchar introduces bill for better broadband data

WASHINGTON--U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, co-chair of the Senate Broadband Caucus, along with Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.V, and Roger Wicker, R-Miss., introduced bipartisan legislation to expand broadband deployment using accurate coverage maps.

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WASHINGTON-U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, co-chair of the Senate Broadband Caucus, along with Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.V, and Roger Wicker, R-Miss., introduced bipartisan legislation to expand broadband deployment using accurate coverage maps.

The Rural Wireless Access Act of 2017 requires the Federal Communications Commission to collect broadband coverage data that is valid, consistent, and robust. This standardized data is necessary to ensure policies to expand broadband deployment accurately target the unserved and underserved communities and account for the mobile coverage experience of those living in the most remote parts of the country.

"As co-chair of the Senate Broadband Caucus, I know we still have work to do to close the digital divide between rural and urban communities. Fast, reliable broadband is critical for rural Minnesotans to access innovative technologies like telemedicine and precision agriculture," Klobuchar said. "This bipartisan legislation will help us do right by our rural communities by ensuring that wireless broadband deployment is guided by the most accurate and reliable data possible."

Related Topics: JOE MANCHIN
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