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Pence must testify in Jan. 6 attack probe, judge rules

In a ruling that remains under seal, the judge also said that Pence can still decline to answer questions related to Jan. 6.

Vice President Mike Pence reads the final certification of Electoral College votes cast in the 2020 presidential election.
Vice President Mike Pence reads the final certification of Electoral College votes cast in the 2020 presidential election during a joint session of Congress, after working through the night, at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 7, 2021.
J. Scott Applewhite /Pool/Getty Images/TNS

WASHINGTON โ€” A federal judge has ruled that former U.S. Vice President Mike Pence must testify to a grand jury about conversations he had with former President Donald Trump leading up to January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol, according to media reports.

In a ruling that remains under seal, the judge also said that Pence can still decline to answer questions related to Jan. 6, CNN reported, citing unnamed sources, adding that Pence can still appeal the ruling.

NBC separately reported the judge's split decision citing sources familiar with the ruling, saying it compels Trump former vice president to appear before the federal grand jury but shields him from testifying about Jan. 6, 2021. The New York Times also said the ruling compels Pence's to appear.

Representatives for Special Prosecutor Jack Smith, who is leading the U.S. Department of Justice's investigation into Trump and his allies' alleged efforts to overturn his 2020 election loss, could not be immediately reached for comment.

Pence's representatives also could not be immediately reached.

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Pence, who is exploring a challenge to Trump for the Republican presidential nomination in 2024, is fighting a grand jury subpoena to secure his testimony, sources have told Reuters.

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This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.

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