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Nisswa: Police to issue 'tickets' to children to redeem for pizza, ice cream or cookie at participating businesses

Dairy Queen and Rafferty's Pizza partner with police department on this safety endeavor

Echo Journal file photo.
Echo Journal file photo.
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Nisswa police officers are looking to give “tickets” to children who are seen wearing a helmet while riding their bikes or for various other reasons.

“Cited” children will be able to choose a ticket for a small ice cream cone at Dairy Queen, a mini pizza at Rafferty’s or a Muddy Turtle (a chocolate chip cookie covered in chocolate and made by The Ugly Cheesecake Company) at Northern Gifts & Sweets.

The businesses are working with police on the safety program, Police Chief Craig Taylor’s written report for the Tuesday, May 18, city council meeting said.

The council learned Officer Jeremy Rooney completed his Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice from Bemidji State University, and Officer Matt Thompson is working toward his degree.

Taylor’s written report also said arrests for several drug offenses have occurred over the last month in the community as a result of traffic enforcement efforts.

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Police activity in April included 17 agency assists, 264 calls for service, four criminal citations, 27 traffic citations, 93 traffic warnings and 11 arrests.

Fire Chief Shawn Bailey’s report said firefighters had 30 runs in April, including four grass fires, 23 emergency medical services calls, two fire alarms and one gas line cut.

Mayor John Ryan and council member Ross Krautkremer were absent from the May 18 council meeting.

In other action May 18, the council:

  • Agreed to close Main Street from 4 p.m. to roughly 9 p.m. for the Freedom Days Parade on Saturday, July 3, and granted approval for the Nisswa Firecracker Run to take place at 8 a.m. Sunday, July 4.

  • Learned the city received a certificate of commendation for its wastewater treatment plant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency for adhering to permit guidelines.

  • Accepted donations: $7,085 from the Nisswa Lions Club and $100 each from Nisswa Insurance Agency and Associates in Eyecare, all for police thermal image equipment; $1,000 for police department needs and $1,000 for fire department needs, both from Barbara Scrimgeour; and $800 from Crow Wing Energized to buy fitness equipment.

  • Approved 2021-2022 liquor licenses.

  • Approved public improvements and roadway assessment policy and procedures in response to the number of developer inquiries city staff has received in the past few months, to ensure the policy provides clear direction for both staff and developers.

The policy outlines proposed language describing the developer’s responsibility when new infrastructure is necessary as part of the project. While staff recognizes there may be situations where it should not be the developer’s sole responsibility to pay for improvements, those situations should be the exception and not the norm for how the city approaches approving development projects.

  • Approved an ordinance amendment allowing council liaisons the opportunity to vote when a commission does not have a quorum and needs to conduct business.

  • Approved the departure of City Clerk Jonathan Stainbrook effective May 14. Stainbrook took a job with the state of Minnesota.

  • Approved a concept plan from Widseth engineering firm for $2,500 for a backage road from Commons Drive to Lower Roy Lake Road so various committees can discuss the pros and cons of the concept and suggest changes before any extensive engineering is completed.

  • Agreed to increase fees for mailbox post and installation to match Crow Wing County’s rates. Rates will go from $35 to $50 for the post and $30 to $40 for installation.

  • Adopted a permits inspection policy. The intent of the new policy is to become more consistent about followup mechanisms for permits issued as well as ensure that lakes and the environment are protected during land development.

Nancy Vogt may be reached at 218-855-5877 or nancy.vogt@pineandlakes.com. Follow her on Facebook and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/@PEJ_Nancy.

Nancy Vogt is editor of the Pineandlakes Echo Journal, a weekly newspaper that covers eight communities in the Pequot Lakes-Pine River areas - from Nisswa to Hackensack and Pequot Lakes to Crosslake.

She started as editor of the Lake Country Echo in July 2006, and continued in that role when the Lake Country Echo and the Pine River Journal combined in September 2013 to become the Pineandlakes Echo Journal. She worked for the Brainerd Dispatch from 1992-2006 in various roles.

She covers Nisswa, Pequot Lakes, Lake Shore and Crosslake city councils, as well as writes feature stories, news stories and personal columns (Vogt's Notes). She also takes photos at community events.

Contact her at nancy.vogt@pineandlakes.com or 218-855-5877 with story ideas or questions. Be sure to leave a voicemail message!
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