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Snowmobiler dies week after crash

The snowmobiler, who was seriously injured in an incident Sunday, Feb. 24, on Highway 371, north of Nisswa has died. Vicki Lynn Gleason, 69, of Waterville, died Tuesday, March 6, at North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale, it states in her o...

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The snowmobiler, who was seriously injured in an incident Sunday, Feb. 24, on Highway 371, north of Nisswa has died.

Vicki Lynn Gleason, 69, of Waterville, died Tuesday, March 6, at North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale, it states in her obituary through the Dennis Funeral and Cremations Services in Waterville.

The Minnesota State Patrol reported Gleason was riding a 2012 Yamaha snowmobile on a snowmobile trail running alongside Highway 371, near the intersection with Crow Wing County Highway 29 and County Road 107, or Wilderness Road.

When approaching a snowmobile bridge spanning a wetland area, Gleason saw another snowmobile on the bridge and was unable to cross, the state patrol reported. Gleason veered to the left into Highway 371 and ended up in the left northbound lane. Then, the snowmobile moved back to the right shoulder, where Gleason attempted to rejoin the snowmobile trail. At that point, Gleason's snowmobile struck a hard-packed snowbank, the state patrol reported, and caused her to flip over.

An off-duty state trooper found Gleason lying on the highway. Gleason, who wore a helmet, suffered a serious head injury and was airlifted to North Memorial.

Related Topics: MINNESOTA STATE PATROL
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