ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Winona, Minn., woman killed in late Tuesday night crash

The 75-year-old woman died Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021, following a crash on southbound Minnesota Highway 61.

Fatal crash police lights
stock photo
We are part of The Trust Project.

WINONA, Minn. -- A Winona woman was killed late Tuesday night, Nov. 23, after striking an unoccupied vehicle that had stalled on the shoulder of Minnesota Highway 61.

Esther Viola Waas, 75, died as a result of her injuries, according to the Minnesota State Patrol crash report. Waas was wearing a seat belt.

Troopers were called about 11:10 p.m. Tuesday to southbound Highway 61 in Rollingstone Township for a report of a crash. A 2009 Toyota Corolla, driven by Waas, was southbound when it struck an unoccupied vehicle stalled on the right shoulder. Waas lost control and went off the road and the vehicle rolled, according to the State Patrol report.

The Goodview Police Department, Winona County Sheriff's Office, Minnesota City Fire Department, Winona Ambulance, Mayo One and the Minnesota Department of Transportation also responded to the crash.

Emily Cutts is the Post Bulletin's public safety reporter. She joined the Post Bulletin in July 2018 after stints in Vermont and Western Massachusetts.
What to read next
The state reported the annual statistics on who received an abortion in the state a week after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to an abortion.
“It’s clear that monkeypox has come to Minnesota,” said state Epidemiologist Dr. Ruth Lynfield. “While our current cases are associated with travel outside Minnesota, we expect we will soon see cases among people who have no travel history or contact with someone who did, indicating that spread within social networks in Minnesota is occurring.”
This year’s contest between Democratic-Farmer-Labor incumbent Steve Simon, who has held the office since 2014, and Republican-endorsed challenger Kim Crockett has seen record levels of fundraising.
Providers say it’s the result of a sinister combination of factors leading working parents and seniors to venture to food shelves for the first time: the rising price of everything — including food — combined with the expiration of a host of COVID-inspired government subsidies, from stimulus checks to tax credits.