Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Baxter Elementary celebrates Veterans Day

BAXTER - About a dozen Baxter Elementary students have a mother, father, aunt or uncle serving in Iraq. On Friday, those students and their peers became a sea of red, white and blue as they sat together in their school gym wearing patriotic color...

1133312+10774_256.jpg

BAXTER - About a dozen Baxter Elementary students have a mother, father, aunt or uncle serving in Iraq.
On Friday, those students and their peers became a sea of red, white and blue as they sat together in their school gym wearing patriotic colors to honor all veterans in a special Veterans Day program at their school.
Baxter Webelo Pack No. 36, Den 1, led by troop leader Rocky Wells, served as the color guard for the ceremony. Muriel Jensen, representing the Nisswa American Legion, read the poem, "I am the Flag." Other veterans who participated included Steve Rosenow, a Vietnam War veteran; Jim Kilts, an Iraqi War veteran; and Don Bode, a veteran of both the Korean and Vietnam wars. The men gave students a history of the U.S. flag, showing a "Betsy Ross" 13-star flag, a 48-star flag, a 49-star flag and finally, the 50-star U.S. flag that students are most familiar with. They also showed students how a flag is properly folded.

Kristina Holte, Baxter, hugged her 3-year-old son, Shepard, Friday after the Veterans Day program at Baxter Elementary School. Holte's husband, Lt. Sam Holte, is serving in Iraq with Echo Company, 134th Brigade Support Battalion, and has been writing to students at Baxter, where two of the Holtes' children attend school. Brainerd Dispatch/Nels Norquist » Purchase reprints of this photo.

A special performance included the singing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" by Bev Dunphy's kindergarten students, who waved flags as they sang. Herman said people have been so impressed by the ability of the 5-year-olds to memorize the national anthem that they've been invited to perform for a few upcoming high school athletic events.
This fall students in a fourth-grade class and a kindergarten class have been paired up to write letters to Lt. Sam Holte of Baxter, who is serving in Iraq with Echo Company, 134th Brigade Support Battalion. During Friday's program, the fourth-graders read the responses they've received from Holte after they asked questions about his life in Iraq. His wife, Kristina, attended the ceremony with their 3-year-old son, Shepard. Their daughter, Adeline, is a kindergartner and son, Owen, is a first-grader at Baxter School. Their son, Collin, is an eighth-grader at Forestview Middle School.

With their hands over their hearts, kindergartners Libby Borash (left) and Noah Ebinger joined their classmates in singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" on Friday at Baxter Elementary School in recognition of Veterans Day. Brainerd Dispatch/Nels Norquist » Purchase reprints of this photo.

Kristina Holte said her husband has enjoyed writing to students and will be excited to hear he was recognized at Friday's ceremony by students as a special veteran who is currently serving his country. The students put together a display of photographs that he e-mailed to them from Iraq.
"I think he'd love it," said Holte.
Other schools, including Brainerd High School and Riverside Elementary, held programs Friday in recognition of Veterans Day on Saturday. The BHS Veterans Day ceremony will be broadcast on Channels 8 and 15 on the Charter Communications and the Consolidated Telecommunications Co. cable systems.
JODIE TWEED can be reached at jodie.tweed@brainerddispatch.com or 855-5858.

ADVERTISEMENT

1133313+10771_256.jpg

What To Read Next
Artificial intelligence can now act as an artist or a writer. Does that mean AI is ready to play doctor? Many institutions, including Mayo Clinic, believe that AI is ready to become a useful tool.
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
The charges filed with the National Labor Relations Board were dropped after the Minnesota Nurses Association agreed to its new contracts with hospitals.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.