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Dayton says he'll push tax-the-rich plan in 2013

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -- Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton says he'll push his plan to raise income taxes on the richest Minnesotans regardless of the state's budget situation next year.

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ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) - Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton says he'll push his plan to raise income taxes on the richest Minnesotans regardless of the state's budget situation next year.

Asked on a Minnesota Public Radio program Monday how long he would keep the proposal in play, Dayton answered "until I'm not governor anymore." Dayton's term runs through 2014 though he says he'll run for another four years.

He campaigned on a promise to increase taxes on top earners. He says it is as much about leveling the percentage of taxes people pay as it is a way to balance a state budget.

Dayton dropped the tax proposal last year during a government shutdown. Majority legislative Republicans objected to it.

His declaration means the tax debate will be a key feature of fall legislative races.

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Copyright 2012 The Associated Press.

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