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Use DIY pallet gardens to grow vegetables in small spaces

Do you love fresh, homegrown produce but don't have a yard? In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out her friend's DIY pallet vegetable garden for small spaces.

Broccoli in garden
Can you grow broccoli in a pallet garden? Sure!
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ROCHESTER, Minn. — Growing some of your own produce can be a great way to work more fruits and veggies into your daily food plan. But how can you grow things if you live in a small place? Try creating a pallet garden.

Plus, an article from the University of Minnesota Extension notes that gardening may boost mood, lower anxiety and get you moving.

How to build a simple, easy DIY pallet garden:

  • Buy a wooden pallet or ask local stores if they have any, as many give them away for free. You might have to remove some slats to make room for the plants.
  • Use landscape fabric that you can buy at garden centers to cover the back of the pallet and line the pockets. This allows for proper drainage.
  • Find a location for your pallet. Save space by leaning it vertically. Secure it to make sure it won't fall over.
  • Fill pockets with potting soil.
  • Plant seeds or seedlings. Follow directions on seed packets or seedling labels.
  • Water frequently, as soil will be shallow and can dry out easily.
  • Watch the plants grow and enjoy!

Plants that I've had luck growing in pallets include, lettuce, kale, onions, cucumber, broccoli, beans, chard and herbs.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
Eating more protein while you're on a diet prompts good things to happen. You'll make better food choices and lose less lean muscle mass. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out a new study from Rutgers University.

Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

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