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Fanning the flames

In the old Charles Bronson films, Bronson would point his hand in a gun-like pose and pretend to "pull the trigger" at punks, bullies and thieves. It became a symbol of those fed up with the crimes going on.

In the old Charles Bronson films, Bronson would point his hand in a gun-like pose and pretend to "pull the trigger" at punks, bullies and thieves. It became a symbol of those fed up with the crimes going on.

If five white NFL St. Louis Cardinal players came charging onto the playing field with their hands held out like that, would the NFL look the other way like they did Sunday with the black players coming out with their hands up? A thorough investigation in Ferguson took place and exonerated the policeman who shot the thieves. These black players are "fanning the flames" as much or more than their Sharpton idol and are only creating a bigger divide in race relations.

Craig Anderson

Brainerd

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