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It's all here

Earlier this summer I wrote and described the history of the Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area (CCSRA) and its impact on the Cuyuna Range communities, both now and, potentially, in the future.

Earlier this summer I wrote and described the history of the Cuyuna Country State Recreation Area (CCSRA) and its impact on the Cuyuna Range communities, both now and, potentially, in the future.

Since then, I am often asked how the community feels about the possibility of changing our 5,000 acres of pristine lakes and forests, including walking and biking trails, back into mining. We now have an answer. Four city councils bordering the Rec Area - Ironton, Crosby, Riverton, Cuyuna - have unanimously voted for resolutions recognizing the present and future economic impact of the CCSRA, and resolving to support and preserve it.

So, listen up state officials, present local politicians and those seeking office, and the people of Crow Wing County. The Cuyuna Range communities honor their past, but look forward to a healthy prosperous future sharing our unique and stunning asset with the world. It's time for all to come together to celebrate our unique treasure. Come and enjoy our CCSRA's silent sports. Whether you hike, bike, scuba dive, fish, canoe, kayak, paddleboard, or just appreciate natural beauty and serenity, it's all here on the Cuyuna.

Barb Grove

Emily

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