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Reader Opinion: Don’t repeal the gas tax

It’s a short-term band aid approach by politicians to gain some political points. The tax will have to be re-imposed at a later date anyway to keep the Highway Trust Fund solvent.

Stack of newspapers on a laptop computer.
We are part of The Trust Project.

In response to the Feb. 17 editorial, “Suspend federal gasoline tax,” I think some important points were left out in the opinion and disagree with some other points discussed. There are governmental roadblocks in place now to discourage production of oil and gas.

Politicians on both sides need to pressure the administration to encourage oil production through increased oil leases on public lands, make sensible regulations and allow approved pipelines to go forward like Keystone. This will increase our oil supply and delivery which creates more competition resulting in lower prices. More of our treasury dollars stay here than buying shortfall oil supply from countries like Russia that can then dictate their agenda.

Congress should also pressure the president’s climate envoy John Kerry to stop compelling banks and financial institutions to reduce their commitments to U.S. oil and gas companies and join the Net-Zero Banking Alliance, which chokes the ability of oil and gas companies to increase production.

I too am shocked by what we are paying at the pump but disagree with some of the other points made in the editorial about dropping the federal gas tax. It’s a short-term Band-aid approach by politicians to gain some political points. The tax will have to be re-imposed at a later date anyway to keep the Highway Trust Fund solvent.

As drivers, you’re supposed to directly benefit from the gas taxes you pay for safer, better roads and bridges. As mentioned in the opinion, the federal gas tax revenue is pumped into a Highway Trust Fund which funds federal and state infrastructure projects for roads, bridges and public transportation systems. If it comes out of general funds as suggested it is still a cost (hidden) to us as taxpayers no matter where the money has to come from.

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Arnold Myhra

Lake Shore

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