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Reader Opinion: Worth it

People on public assistance, who are able to work, not retired and not employed, could contribute to the common good by volunteering at a nonprofit.

Stack of newspapers on a laptop computer.
We are part of The Trust Project.

A while back, I spoke with a friend about how I thought people on public assistance, who are able to work, not retired and not employed, could contribute to the common good.

My idea was to have them do volunteer-like work, a few hours a week for nonprofits, to receive public assistance.

I don’t believe that this would require a big bureaucracy to run it because it could be run similarly to how people who have broken a law do community service. Such people work at nonprofits and have their hours signed off by the nonprofit’s manager.

If some people on assistance did work at a nonprofit and had their hours worked signed off by the nonprofit manager, they could turn their hour slips into the community service volunteer office and that way be held accountable to work.

Sure it would take a new person or two at the community service volunteer office to keep track of who did and didn’t put in hours but wouldn’t it be worth it?

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Patrick Borden

Brainerd

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