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Mills' tax policies

Those who lump 8th District congressional candidate Stewart Mills III and Gov. Mark Dayton together simply because both inherited great wealth are missing the point. No one - certainly not Rick Nolan- is criticizing Mr. Mills III for being wealthy.

Those who lump 8th District congressional candidate Stewart Mills III and Gov. Mark Dayton together simply because both inherited great wealth are missing the point. No one - certainly not Rick Nolan- is criticizing Mr. Mills III for being wealthy.

Nolan is simply pointing out that Mills III advocates tax policies that would make wealthy people - including Mr. Mills III - even wealthier at the expense of middle class and low-income people who are forced to make up the difference every pay day. On top of that, Mills III - who makes several hundred dollars an hour on the family payroll - opposes raising the minimum wage to just $10.10 an hour.

Gov. Dayton, on the other hand, raised taxes on the top 2 percent of Minnesota's richest people - including himself - in order to enhance opportunities for those less fortunate than he is. And he spearheaded the drive to raise Minnesota's minimum wage.

Like Gov. Dayton, Nolan is fighting for a tax system that is fair to all. Mr. Mills III obviously sees the tax system as a tool to enrich himself and the rest of America's elite.

Mary Krueger

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Royalton

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