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Reader Opinion: A non-event

Referring to a front page article in the Dispatch on March 25 and a Reader Opinion article on March 28. The Reader Opinion writer's reply made sense.

Referring to a front page article in the Dispatch on March 25 and a Reader Opinion article on March 28. The Reader Opinion writer's reply made sense.

The article was on area Republicans backing a bill to limit transgender public bathroom sharing.

I could not control being upset over our elected officials spending the precious legislative time that they have over a non-event that would have an impact on the population so small you could hardly measure it. I saw this as another "wedgey" designed to take your mind and vote away from what are the real problems in comparison.

I asked the Dispatch to check on the number of cases on file to see if this is a big problem. You do the same.

How much time in your life do you spend in public bathrooms? So far how many transgenders have bothered you or attacked you? It is possible that it could happen. It is also possible you could be trampled by a herd of of buffalo. Does this alleged problem also extend to the baby changing station where the gender is not the same?

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The point I am trying to make is there is a enough division without wasting our trust and money on a next to non-event when there is so much more work to do that could benefit us all.

John Orr

Deerwood

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