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Reader Opinion: All lives matter

The St. Paul Pioneer Press quoted some Black Lives Matter tweets from around the country and the one I found most interesting was from a black gentleman who has made a very comfortable life for himself by fueling and fanning the flames of racism....

The St. Paul Pioneer Press quoted some Black Lives Matter tweets from around the country and the one I found most interesting was from a black gentleman who has made a very comfortable life for himself by fueling and fanning the flames of racism. The Reverend Jesse Jackson tweeted: "Do not blame #BlackLivesMatter for brutal execution of sheriff in Texas. Scapegoating is unfair."

The good reverend is concerned about, and comments only on, the alleged scapegoating of the gutless BLM nut who fired 15 bullets into the an officer of the law. So, let's be careful how we think and talk about Afro-American murderers. Remember that black lives matter unless those lives are in the womb or on the south side of Chicago, There they just have to take their chances.

I know of several black lives that matter very much. Our son and daughter-in-law went to Ethiopia four times (twice for each child). Both Marie and Micah are now deeply loved, well fed, well educated U.S. citizens free of disease, famine, pestilence and war from neighboring tribes.

Let there be peace on earth. Love to all.

Stephen A. Busch

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Woodbury

Related Topics: BLACK LIVES MATTER
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