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Reader Opinion: Another example of hypocrisy

We have all heard Republicans complain about our government using "their" tax dollars to benefit the poor and needy. They've said that such people should be responsible for themselves instead of relying on Uncle Sam to provide for them. They say ...

We have all heard Republicans complain about our government using "their" tax dollars to benefit the poor and needy. They've said that such people should be responsible for themselves instead of relying on Uncle Sam to provide for them. They say that amounts to socialism, which they are very much against.

With that in mind, by Republican logic, shouldn't the people and businesses impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma be responsible for themselves? If said people and businesses chose not to purchase flood insurance, for instance, should they expect or depend upon a government handout to provide for their needs?

So, that raises these questions: Why are these Republicans OK with using "socialism" to clean up after these storms, instead of letting the free market (that they are so in favor of) take care of things? Why did a Republican-controlled Congress vote to spend billions of our tax dollars to provide direct assistance to hurricane victims, and a Republican president sign the bill?

After all, that sure seems to be just another fine example of Republican hypocrisy.

Brian Marsh

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Brainerd

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