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Reader Opinion: Choices

Some are talented liars. In the words of "Dallas" character J.R. Ewing, "It's all about integrity. Once you can fake that, the rest is a piece of cake."...

Some are talented liars. In the words of "Dallas" character J.R. Ewing, "It's all about integrity. Once you can fake that, the rest is a piece of cake."

In the Sept. 21 Washington Post Our Opinion column, Trump and Clinton's reaction to the New York and New Jersey explosions are compared. The Post says Trump's response of "a bomb went off" and "knock the hell out of 'em" would be a reckless way to do business in the Oval Office. They go on to say "Hillary Clinton wanted to know the facts, and called for the support of first responders and prayers for the injured ... the kind of calm and caution one naturally expects from a leader."

Are they "True Colors?" ("Clinton, Trump show true colors"). It may seem like a toss-up as to who has integrity, if any. Honest brashness followed with credible and successful actions and policies is preferable to clever deceitfulness and fakery.

The renowned economist and philosopher, Thomas Sowell, when asked recently about Trump replied, "Risky, versus certain disaster."

There's more hope for good changes for a voter who makes an educated risk than succumbing to more years of sure-proven disaster.

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Judy Novotny

Motley

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