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Reader Opinion: Elections

Kathleen Parker's article in the Dispatch on Wednesday was spot on. You don't win a seat in Congress in this country anymore, you buy it and that puts the reins in the hands of very few people because it takes an outlandish amount of money to run...

Kathleen Parker's article in the Dispatch on Wednesday was spot on. You don't win a seat in Congress in this country anymore, you buy it and that puts the reins in the hands of very few people because it takes an outlandish amount of money to run for office. Not only has congress made it this way - they knew it was wrong so they took time to make laws to hide the ways they do this. Then to go one step further - they not only made it this way, they got the Supreme Court to buy into it with them. The same court that is supposed to safeguard us against unscrupulous legislation and the only people we can't vote out of office. Like a cancer, it has metastasized its way down the ladder to many elections.

Greed raises its ugly head in many aspects of our lives. But nowhere is it more dangerous than when the very people who are supposed to be our leaders use it for political gain. Trust is imperative in every business deal. Our elections are just that. A contract between the voters and the candidates to run this country. How can we trust people to do their best for us when they have shown us the only way they can get there is to be deceptive?

Campaign reform is not rocket science. A fair way to do this is easily put into practice and if I'm right, our forefathers did just that when they started all of this way back then. They wanted the real power of the elections to rest in the hands of each and every one of us. Congress has done their best to take that power away from all but a few.

Mike Holst

Crosslake

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