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Reader Opinion: Failing

The red line for President Trump ought to be any attempt by him to fire the special counsel, Robert Mueller. The two men are polar opposites, with Mueller being a decorated war hero and Trump being a relative draft dodger with several petty defer...

The red line for President Trump ought to be any attempt by him to fire the special counsel, Robert Mueller. The two men are polar opposites, with Mueller being a decorated war hero and Trump being a relative draft dodger with several petty deferments.

Many of us who are students of America's political process could see the potential with a presidency of total incompetence, unsuited credentials and mean spirited name calling belligerence.

Upon Trump's congratulation to Vladimir Putin for winning another rigged election in Russia, just after having attempted to murder an agent in England (his daughter, too), we in

America should be outraged with the totally inappropriate behavior of this ill tempered small minded man. Soon, with the ongoing dysfunction of this presidency, he will have to go, one way or the other!

That the Republican party says little in push back toward the denigration of our nation, the leaders of our institutions and the integrity of his office, the shame of their

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inaction will come back to bite them. The party of Trump is failing at leadership and failing our American culture.

Allen VanLandschoot

Baxter

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