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Reader Opinion: Feeling indignant

I was out driving in the July 12 level 2 storm. When I saw the blackout in Baxter and heard the sirens, I stopped driving toward Nisswa and retreated to Cub Foods which had power due to their generator truck. I was so glad to have a lighted, welc...

I was out driving in the July 12 level 2 storm. When I saw the blackout in Baxter and heard the sirens, I stopped driving toward Nisswa and retreated to Cub Foods which had power due to their generator truck. I was so glad to have a lighted, welcoming place to wait in before getting safely home to Pequot Lakes.

In the weeks since the storm I've been reading many of the stories in the Dispatch. Soon I noticed a common theme that made me feel very indignant.

"Stay out of the affected areas!" officials kept saying sternly over and over.

This storm happened to all of us. My house wasn't damaged but I still wanted to have understanding and empathy for what other people were going through. It's my community and I need to see it for myself to really understand.

As long as I didn't impede traffic or disobey any laws or get in the way of repair crews, then I can drive on any public road I want. I felt so angry to be repeatedly scolded in the articles and told where not to go when I hadn't done anything wrong or gotten in anyone's way.

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Charissa J. Grover

Pequot Lakes

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