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Reader Opinion: Great concerts coming

I'm ecstatic that the Lakes Area Music Festival has returned to our area for another season. Co-founders Scott Lykins and Taylor Ward have put together a magnificent program for the Week of Aug. 1-7. The very popular and famous "Moonlight Sonata"...

I'm ecstatic that the Lakes Area Music Festival has returned to our area for another season.

Co-founders Scott Lykins and Taylor Ward have put together a magnificent program for the Week of Aug. 1-7.

The very popular and famous "Moonlight Sonata" will be played on Wednesday, Aug. 3, at 7 p.m. in Tornstrom Auditorium in Brainerd.

There will be an "After-Glow" reception post concert at Prairie Bay Restaurant. This is a fun way to meet the musicians and chat with other concert goers.

On Sunday, Aug. 7, at 2 p.m. in Tornstrom Auditorium, Marlene Pauley, the returning crowd-pleasing conductor, will present "Bedtime Stories." The Concert will be one to bring the whole family. We will be treated to "Scheherazade," "Jack and the Beanstalk," "The Mother Goose Suite," and closing with Stravinsky's "Firebird Suite."

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Folks, park the boat beside the dock, gather your summer company into the care and plan to attend these outstanding music festival concerts. Put Wednesday, Aug. 3, and Sunday, Aug. 7, on your calendars of summer lake events not to miss. You will be glad you did.

Luann Rice

Baxter

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