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Reader Opinion: How did we get here?

The state Legislature has taken the governor to court. How did we get here? The process this year has me concerned. The state Legislature passed two budget bills. The first one was done late April or early May and the governor sent it back signin...

The state Legislature has taken the governor to court. How did we get here?

The process this year has me concerned. The state Legislature passed two budget bills. The first one was done late April or early May and the governor sent it back signing none of it. The second was done and before him several days before the end of session. He did look at it and started to negotiate still needing a special session.

Now, supposedly, he and his team were directly involved in negotiating the bill which he signed. But as he signed it he said that there was a "poison pill" added by the Republicans in the Legislature. Further he stated that he, his staff and the DFL in the Legislature did not get a chance to read the final draft. Oddly, the drafts were available through the entire process and updated daily with changes. And the final version was available over 36 hours before signing.

Now to me, anyone involved in the negotiating would know what is in the bill. Of course, we do have to remember this is the same governor who took immense credit and pleasure in getting the US Bank Stadium deal negotiated and approved then within two months claimed he knew nothing about the seat licensing in the deal. How can that be if he was so involved in the negotiations?

Patricia Seifert

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