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Reader Opinion: How it works

Have you ever wondered what our government would be like without paid lobbyists who have lots of money to hand out? I have no problem with lobbyists; they serve a function educating legislators about their views and why they are important. Others...

Have you ever wondered what our government would be like without paid lobbyists who have lots of money to hand out? I have no problem with lobbyists; they serve a function educating legislators about their views and why they are important. Others give opposing views and somewhere in the mix legislators are to make an informed decision. What's complicating this process? Money. Call it blackmail, call it extortion, call it what you may, if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck it's a duck.

Our Supreme Court, which was never meant to be apolitical, and sadly is all political, has no problem with this. Most of those justices chose sides and became an extension of one of the two political parties long before they were nominated. After all if they hadn't, they would not have been nominated. So sadly you have a government that works for those who will pay them. Those people called voters or constituents, not so much.

Reform can only come when the money is taken out of the mix. It's like putting the cookie jar up above the cupboards to keep the kids out of it because they lack discipline. Actually I think the kids have more discipline than our legislators.

Here's the real problem. The only people that can cause reform in Congress are the ones who created this mess and they like it that way. Trump said he would drain the swamp but anybody who knows the process of doing that knows change comes with cutting off the head of the snake-and the money. Trump cannot do that. Until the voters of this country can, or will do that, expect more business as usual from the people we elected to look out for us.

Mike Holst

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Crosslake

Related Topics: U.S. SUPREME COURT
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