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Reader Opinion: Listen to the people

At the May 16 Crow Wing County Board of Adjustment hearing the variances requested by the developer of a new timeshare resort were discussed. It appeared that the board members had their own opinions of the variances that were contrary to the man...

At the May 16 Crow Wing County Board of Adjustment hearing the variances requested by the developer of a new timeshare resort were discussed. It appeared that the board members had their own opinions of the variances that were contrary to the many public comments they had received. All the public comments revolved around concerns of negative environmental impacts. The board members had imposed conditions on the project that the board members believed addressed those concerns. However, the individuals making the comments understood the variances and were aware of the conditions-and still they thought the variances should not be allowed. The board members chose to disregard or minimize the relevance of the public comments. It looked like the Board of Adjustment members see themselves as advocates for this project developer and are willing to ignore valid comments that don't support the outcome the developer wants. Their stated reasoning was that short term economic development trumps all the other concerns. It might be better if we had board members that listen to and represent all residents of Crow Wing County.

Dave OBrien

Ideal Township

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