ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Reader Opinion: Not even wrong

"Not even wrong," is a quote attributed to Professor Wolfgang Pauli in regards to a scientific paper that he thought to be so bad that he considered it, "not even wrong." Pauli won the 1945 Nobel Prize in physics for his exclusion principle.

"Not even wrong," is a quote attributed to Professor Wolfgang Pauli in regards to a scientific paper that he thought to be so bad that he considered it, "not even wrong." Pauli won the 1945 Nobel Prize in physics for his exclusion principle.

The Oct. 14 "A different approach" writer says, "One must take into consideration all the mass of the stars acting on our solar system, this changes the center of mass. And if earth is at the center of the universe, one can easily see how the sun can orbit around the earth." This statement fits Pauli's "not even wrong" analysis. The statement is preposterous. The writer forgets that stellar mass would also affect Earth. The sun is so massive (331,000 Earths) that in accordance with Newton's Laws, Earth would be affected to a much greater extent than the sun. It's not as if there is a huge stick pin holding Earth in place in the universe like a bug pinned to cardboard.

Brahe's geocentric (Earth-centered) theory isn't correct for at least three basic reasons. Brahe cannot explain stellar parallax. Brahe cannot easily explain retrograde motion of Mars without introducing very complicated motions (epicycles) that violate all laws of science. Brahe cannot explain stellar aberration. Stellar aberration is an astronomical phenomenon which produces an apparent motion of celestial objects. It can be proven mathematically that stellar aberration is due to the change of the position of Earth and not the stars. In other words Earth orbits the sun.

Earth isn't the center of the solar system and, most certainly, not the center of the universe. There is no center to the universe.

Fred Baker

ADVERTISEMENT

Motley

What To Read Next
“Living” is a new drama starring English actor Bill Nighy a veteran civil servant who receives a terminal diagnosis from his doctor and decides to live it up with the help of a plucky young woman.
“Missing” is a new mystery or thriller about a single mom who disappears on a romantic vacation with her boyfriend. It’s up to her 18-year-old digital-savvy daughter to find out what really happened.
Based on the international bestselling book, “A Man Called Otto” starring Tom Hanks is the English language remake of the 2015 Swedish film “A Man Called Ove."
The regents and presidents of the University of Minnesota have increasingly been moving more and more assets away from struggling students and into the pockets of overpaid administrators.