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Reader Opinion: Ordinary heroes

Democracy requires ordinary heroes. By validating the importance of each citizen, democracy recognizes the innate value of experiential knowledge and life wisdom as a basis for decision-making for the benefit of all. It is based on respect and co...

Democracy requires ordinary heroes. By validating the importance of each citizen, democracy recognizes the innate value of experiential knowledge and life wisdom as a basis for decision-making for the benefit of all. It is based on respect and collaboration to find mutual solutions to social problems. And when things begin to get out of balance, unfair and/or unequal, each and every citizen has the ability to step up and speak truth.

There are two different kinds of heroes. There are those who are professionally trained to deal with difficult situations for the community. In fact, that is one of the ideas behind professionalism, that they will do their job and rise above their personal instincts to do what is right or important in the moment. We can quickly see that they could be firefighters, police officers, military personnel, but also doctors, plumbers, electricians, etc.

The other kind of heroes can be anyone who, when confronted with a dangerous, and unexpected situation for which they have no formal training, does not let the fear and panic close them down, but instead step up to do what is humanly necessary. They may have never seen themselves operating that way, but somehow, they find the inner strength to do so when life calls upon them. They are the ordinary heroes.

A healthy democracy requires that we recognize the need to become ordinary heroes when presented with significant human challenges defending life and limb, but also defending our democracy and our planet.

"We hold these truths to be sacred & undeniable; that all men are created equal & independent, that from that equal creation they derive rights inherent & inalienable, among which are the preservation of life, & liberty, & the pursuit of happiness."

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An ordinary citizen hero acts on those founding principles.

Bob Passi

Baxter

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