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Reader Opinion: The price of health care

I have had my usual discussion of Obamacare with a Republican that has a better education on economics than I. They not only took courses in economics but enjoyed micro- and macro- economics. Our discussion came to that Obamacare wouldn't bring d...

I have had my usual discussion of Obamacare with a Republican that has a better education on economics than I. They not only took courses in economics but enjoyed micro- and macro- economics. Our discussion came to that Obamacare wouldn't bring down the cost of health care. The only way to bring down the cost of healthcare would be to cut down on the use of health care which could only be accomplished by getting rid of the ability of people to receive free medical treatment. Make people have the money to pay for health care before they received it. Do away with the requirement for Medicaid to cover poor people and emergency rooms to treat people who come in without cash, or an insurance card. This would eliminate a lot of tests, and unnecessary treatment. Poor people that couldn't afford health care would just die. That isn't rationing health care it is just free market adjusting. With less use, nurses and doctors. wouldn't be needed as much so there would be a surplus and they wouldn't be able to charge as much, the unions wouldn't have as much leverage. That would bring down the price of health care. My thought on the matter is that it would eliminate a lot of babies being born in a hospital, now days a simple birth at the hospital is a round $20,000 most working class people in the childbearing age couldn't afford that so it would happen at home with the help of dad and maybe a relative or neighbor like it used to, it would keep babies affordable. It should bring down the cost of Social Security pretty quick a lot less people would survive long enough to collect. I sort of like the affordable care act even if doesn't affect me.

Jesse Nix

Emily

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