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Reader Opinion: Three strikes

The July 30 author of "The crime of Galileo" tries to make a comparison of the opposition Galileo received for teaching heliocentricity with the opposition some scientists receive today for teaching that man made carbon dioxide is causing global ...

The July 30 author of "The crime of Galileo" tries to make a comparison of the opposition Galileo received for teaching heliocentricity with the opposition some scientists receive today for teaching that man made carbon dioxide is causing global warming. We need to use a little common sense here.

About a thousand years ago, Ma Nature was going through "global warming," then came the "Little Ice Age." It's just a cycle thing, no need for alarmism. Consider all the gases in the atmosphere as a hundred story building; man's contribution of CO2 amounts to the thickness of the linoleum on the first floor. Does the tail (man-made CO2) wag the elephant? And this does not even take into account that the ocean and terrestrial areas contain 60-80 times as much CO2 as the atmosphere and act as a giant storage reservoir, releasing CO2 and then absorbing CO2 from the atmosphere at variable rates.

Galileo's heliocentric theory has no basis today. With the crude instrumentation available at his time heliocentricity seemed plausible but the theory started falling apart by the 1880s; even Einstein indicated there was no proof for it. In 1989, NASA sent up COBE to map the cosmic

microwave radiation that permeates the known universe. They were shocked to find the universe split into two hemispheres with it's dipole axis passing through the earth's equinox plane (equator); putting earth at or near the center of the universe. They sent WMAP up in 2001 to double check using higher resolution instruments. Same conclusion. Europe sent up PLANCK in 2009, capable of measuring temperature variations to a millionth of a degree.

Same conclusion. Three strikes you're out, Galileo.

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Phil Drietz

Delhi

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