ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Reader Opinion: Too many debates

We have been bombarded by presidential debates ad nauseam. Why does anyone think that the sheer number of them is even necessary? It's a misnomer to even call these gatherings a debate. Most of the time, instead of answering the moderators' quest...

We have been bombarded by presidential debates ad nauseam. Why does anyone think that the sheer number of them is even necessary?

It's a misnomer to even call these gatherings a debate. Most of the time, instead of answering the moderators' questions, the candidates simply launch into their standard stump speeches, where they disperse their same old, tired talking points.

So, we really aren't learning anything new, except on the Republican side, where we learn that their candidates' idea of how to act presidential is to behave like 10-year-olds and what a three-ring circus looks like. Since when do name-calling, personal attacks amount to a debate? At least give Hillary and Bernie credit for conducting a civil discourse during their debates.

I think that two, or possibly three, debates should be quite enough for the public to decide on a candidate to support. Any more beyond that seems to be designed solely for television ratings and keeping the talking-head political pundits employed.

Brian Marsh

ADVERTISEMENT

Brainerd

What To Read Next
“Living” is a new drama starring English actor Bill Nighy a veteran civil servant who receives a terminal diagnosis from his doctor and decides to live it up with the help of a plucky young woman.
“Missing” is a new mystery or thriller about a single mom who disappears on a romantic vacation with her boyfriend. It’s up to her 18-year-old digital-savvy daughter to find out what really happened.
Based on the international bestselling book, “A Man Called Otto” starring Tom Hanks is the English language remake of the 2015 Swedish film “A Man Called Ove."
The regents and presidents of the University of Minnesota have increasingly been moving more and more assets away from struggling students and into the pockets of overpaid administrators.