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Reader Opinion: Two options

Two ways to solve the serious shortage of teachers in Minnesota (especially rural Minnesota which has been hit the hardest). Option 1: Actually provide schools with the funding needed to keep pace with inflation and compete with career alternativ...

Two ways to solve the serious shortage of teachers in Minnesota (especially rural Minnesota which has been hit the hardest).

Option 1: Actually provide schools with the funding needed to keep pace with inflation and compete with career alternatives in which teachers may flock towards.

Option 2: Lower the standards of getting qualified, competent applicants to fill the gaps. Promote hiring of lesser trained teachers.

Option 1 views teaching as being handled by trained professionals. Option 2 views teaching as just slots to fill. Just check the box.

Option 1 recognizes that the teacher shortage may be due to the fact that 40-50 percent of teachers won't make it to year five amid the pressures and skillset of the vocation in regards to received compensation.

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Option 2 says it is because those who can't-teach.

Looks like the Minnesota House just voted for Option 2.

Interesting, since seemingly many of those who favor Option 2 are vocal about increasing "school accountability" when it comes to grades, test scores, etc.

If given the choice of these two options, which "solution" do you want to see in regards to the schooling of your children/grandchildren/nieces/nephews?

Dan Moddes

Baxter

Related Topics: EDUCATION
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