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Reader Opinion: Vote for sanity

The vote is one of the few remnants of democracy that still offers ordinary citizens a way to make their voices heard. There are growing pressures to restrict the vote including purges of voting roles, limiting voter registration and limiting vot...

The vote is one of the few remnants of democracy that still offers ordinary citizens a way to make their voices heard. There are growing pressures to restrict the vote including purges of voting roles, limiting voter registration and limiting voting hours and locations as well as gerrymandering districts.

In a system that has become an oligarchy of the rich and powerful who have captured and firmly control the levers of power of the nation, it is extremely important to make the voices supporting a return to a sane democracy heard. Those controlling the nation are sure that their dominance will simply silence us into frustrated apathy. It is important to vote so they see that our loyal opposition is alive and well.

How to vote? Well, we have one party that controls the nation from the federal level down to the state and local levels after the 2016 election. It is busy giving huge tax breaks to the very rich while cutting social services for the ordinary citizens. It creates huge deficits and then suggests cutting Social Security and Medicare to pay for them.

Vote only for people who want to move us back to a sane democracy.

Bob Passi

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Baxter

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