ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Reader Opinion: Welfare is a game

Welfare is a program designed to rob the needy in this country. The rich came up with this program. It's a game called a shell game. You should see the forms you have to fill out to get $5.

Welfare is a program designed to rob the needy in this country. The rich came up with this program. It's a game called a shell game. You should see the forms you have to fill out to get $5.

I have to say it is a smokescreen or a numbers game just like this gambling, just to rob Peter to pay Paul.

I was in Tri-County Health Care for health problems. Then Fair Oaks TCU. They did a grand job of caring for me. Only problem was my crew of cats had to be fed all the time. Tuffy's Cat Food, a big bag a week, but maybe they got along.

In summary, welfare does not work to help the poor. Just like giving $2,500 a month to people in need. They would find a way to steal it all back. The banks would come up with bank fees to steal it all.

Then for my pickup, two brake jobs, two alternators, etc., when a new pickup would have solved the problem.

ADVERTISEMENT

The main project would be to find jobs for these welfare clients. Everyone would be proud to join the American work force. The work crew, all American, going to work every day of the year. We, the United States of America, going to work every day of the year. Yes, yes, yes! Going to work every day. No more welfare! We can do anything.

Thomas A. Hostad

Wadena

What To Read Next
“Living” is a new drama starring English actor Bill Nighy a veteran civil servant who receives a terminal diagnosis from his doctor and decides to live it up with the help of a plucky young woman.
“Missing” is a new mystery or thriller about a single mom who disappears on a romantic vacation with her boyfriend. It’s up to her 18-year-old digital-savvy daughter to find out what really happened.
Based on the international bestselling book, “A Man Called Otto” starring Tom Hanks is the English language remake of the 2015 Swedish film “A Man Called Ove."
The regents and presidents of the University of Minnesota have increasingly been moving more and more assets away from struggling students and into the pockets of overpaid administrators.