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Reader Opinion: Why single payer is bad

As President Reagan once quipped, "It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so." Much of this can be attributed to willful ignorance, some of it might be a matter of semantics. After all, on...

As President Reagan once quipped, "It isn't so much that liberals are ignorant. It's just that they know so many things that aren't so."

Much of this can be attributed to willful ignorance, some of it might be a matter of semantics. After all, one little change here, one little misinterpretation there, and pretty soon people think they have a convincing argument.

One writer recently rebutted my earlier letter.

He said, "Single-payer is a national health insurance system. You get a health care card and you can go to any doctor or hospital in the United States. Another eye-opener: With our current free market solution, 120 people die every day from lack of health insurance! In Canada (single-payer), zero people die per day due to lack of health insurance."

Here is where semantics come in.

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Having an insurance plan is not the same as having health care.

Imagine that you received a free membership to a health club. You go to the club, you can get in, but are not allowed to use the equipment inside.

National health care is infamous for providing insurance, but not always health care. Why do Canadians come to America for health care if their system is so good? Because they have insurance, but not access to care until the government says so!

The fairy tale that "zero people die" with national insurance is a pitiful joke. Just ask the parents of English babies dying because the government denies further treatments! These children all had government "insurance." But they were denied "health care" because once any government is the sole provider of it, the government decides who gets to live, and who must die.

Socialist economics becomes the death panel.

And that, dear neighbors, is why governments should never be allowed to run health care.

Tony Bauer

Nisswa

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