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Vote on issues, not slander

Virtually every campaign ad I see from Rick Nolan demeans almost to the point of slander, his opponent, Stewart Mills. Apparently, Mr. Nolan doesn't believe in the American Dream because he says Mr. Mills is a bad person because he has accumulate...

Virtually every campaign ad I see from Rick Nolan demeans almost to the point of slander, his opponent, Stewart Mills. Apparently, Mr. Nolan doesn't believe in the American Dream because he says Mr. Mills is a bad person because he has accumulated some wealth and makes a good living. Nolan even provides actual numbers as to Mills' wealth and income although I doubt he has access to this information. It doesn't really matter because any candidate's financial information really isn't relevant to his or her ability to serve in office. The Mills family has worked hard over the years and has undoubtedly accumulated resources. At the same time they have provided literally thousands of jobs for our neighbors and have given back greatly to the communities they are located in. Using Nolan's logic we should not work hard to get ahead because if we "make it" we become evil wealthy people.

Nolan should tell us what he has done and what he is going to do so we can vote on issues, not slander. With the facts as presented to date, my vote in this race will be for Stewart Mills.

Gary McEnelly

Baxter

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