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MISSISSIPPI RIVER

A family of boaters discovered the baby on Sept. 5, 2011. While they believed they were picking trash from the water, they discovered a baby wrapped inside a tote bag.
Coffee with the great danes
The Mississippi is the source of drinking water for 20 million Americans in 50 U.S. cities, and generates an estimated $400 billion a year in economic activity. It’s also home to more than 800 species of fish and wildlife, and is a major flyway for waterfowl and migratory birds.
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From the Great Lakes to great rivers, the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean and Canadian canals, the 6,000-mile trip is one for the ages.

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In August, the U.S. Drought Monitor reported parts of Minnesota were in the worst drought category for exceptional drought for the first time since the monitor began in 1994.
After nearly 20 inches of snow fell this week, the skies cleared and cold temperatures descended.
“The biggest desire from the city is to activate some space where people can have interaction with the Mississippi,” Brainerd Mayor Dave Badeaux said.
The drought of 2021 created low water levels that helped historians search the bottom of the Mississippi River in Brainerd for historic artifacts, which dated back to the origin of the city.
Stepping stones
A look through the Brainerd Dispatch archives with Terry McCollough combing the microfilm for tidbits of history through the decades going back to 1921.

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The Northern Pacific Railroad bridge over the Mississippi River in Brainerd collapsed in 1875 while a train was on it. The engineer, a fireman and several passengers died in the accident. The engine, nearly a dozen cars of merchandise and almost a dozen cars of steel rails went into the river.
In 1875, the span of the Northern Pacific Railroad bridge in Brainerd from the west side of the Mississippi River to the middle of the bridge collapsed as a train went over it.
Natalie Warren and Ann Raiho were the first women to paddle the 2,000 mile journey from Minneapolis to the Hudson Bay, following the route featured in Eric Sevareid’s 1935 classic, “Canoeing with the Cree.”

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