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RED RIVER VALLEY

Latest Headlines
The Red River Valley Water Supply Project will sue farmland owners for eminent domain if they don’t sign easements before July 8, 2022. Farmers say the project is paying one-tenth what others pay for far smaller oil, gas and water pipelines.
A warmup is coming in June, but conflicting forces make it impossible to predict whether the summer will be hot and dry or hot and wet.
A La Niña weather pattern can produce a colder, snowier winter on the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest, but sometimes is overridden by other weather systems. This winter likely will be colder and snowier than last year's mild, dry winter, forecasters say.
Sugarbeet harvest plays a large role in the Red River Valley's agriculture industry. Due to the harvest being non-stop once the campaign begins, many local businesses extend their hours in an effort to rally behind sugarbeet producers.
Sugarbeet harvest in the Red River Valley is an around the clock operation, requiring a multitude of seasonal workers to get the job done.
Farmers in the southern Red River Valley who experienced drought conditions a month ago, along with 50 mph winds, now have gotten a shot of rain. Soils that moved also moved weed seed, which can contaminate neighboring fields with tough-to-control waterhemp. A return to hot, dry conditions makes those weeds even harder to control.

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WDAY chief meteorologist John Wheeler warns that, without needed rains, the drought could become severe this summer.
American Crystal Sugar Co.’s political action committee says it will continue supporting candidates important to agricultural policy considerations and won’t base decisions based on one vote to accept or reject Electoral College votes in the presidential race.
The Sproule sisters — Annie Gorder, Mollie Ficocello and Grace Lunski — recently launched Three Farm Daughters, which takes the GoodWheat variety grown on the farm and transforms it into products like flour and pasta.

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