Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Avoid tragedy by talking with kids about ice safety

While ice is never 100% safe, ice in the early stages of formation is particularly dangerous. Falls through the ice or into open water at this time of year can turn tragic quickly, and each year result in serious injuries or deaths.

A dad stands next to a frozen lake with his kids.
The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources reminds everyone to be extremely cautious around the water and, with children home for Thanksgiving break, to talk with them about the risks of cold water and ice.
Contributed / Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
We are part of The Trust Project.

A pre-Thanksgiving cold snap meant some lakes and ponds across Minnesota are beginning to freeze. However, this ice isn’t safe to walk on and the water underneath is dangerously cold.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, in a news release Wednesday, Nov. 22, reminded everyone to be extremely cautious around the water and, with children home for Thanksgiving break, to talk with them about the risks of cold water and ice.

While ice is never 100% safe, ice in the early stages of formation is particularly dangerous. Falls through the ice or into open water at this time of year can turn tragic quickly, and each year result in serious injuries or deaths.

Parents and guardians need to be especially vigilant about watching kids and ensuring children’s innate curiosity about the water and ice doesn’t put them at risk.

“Kids, and people who haven’t experienced winter in Minnesota, may not have enough knowledge to mitigate the risks associated with cold water and early ice,” said Col. Rodmen Smith, DNR Enforcement Division director, in a news release. “Talk to your kids, talk to your neighbors—we all have a role to play in keeping people safe as the winter season gets underway.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Anyone who recreates on the ice should wait until there’s at least 4 inches of new, clear ice before walking out onto it. Other tips for staying safe around cold water and on the ice include:

  • Wearing a foam life jacket or flotation suit.
  • Not going out alone—and letting someone know about trip plans and expected return time.
  • Carrying ice picks, rope, an ice chisel and tape measure.
  • Checking ice thickness at regular intervals; conditions can change quickly.
  • Bringing a cell phone or personal locator beacon.
  • Inquiring about conditions and known hazards with local experts before heading out.

For more information about staying safe on the ice, including thickness recommendations for various types of activities, see the DNR’s ice safety page at mndnr.gov/icesafety . For more information about surviving a fall into cold water, see the cold water dangers page at mndnr.gov/coldwater .

Our newsroom occasionally reports stories under a byline of "staff." Often, the "staff" byline is used when rewriting basic news briefs that originate from official sources, such as a city press release about a road closure, and which require little or no reporting. At times, this byline is used when a news story includes numerous authors or when the story is formed by aggregating previously reported news from various sources. If outside sources are used, it is noted within the story.

Hi, I'm the Brainerd Dispatch. I started working a few days before Christmas in 1881 and became a daily paper two years later. I've gone through a lot of changes over the years, but what has never changed is my commitment to community and to local journalism. I've got an entire team of dedicated people who work night and day to make sure I go out every morning, whether in print, as an e-edition, via an app or with additional information at www.brainerddispatch.com. News, weather, sports — videos, photos, podcasts and social media — all covering stories from central Minnesota about your neighbors, your lakes, your communities, your challenges and your opportunities. It's all part of the effort to keep people connected and informed. And we couldn't do it without support.
What To Read Next
Exclusive
Hutchinson teen Zac Padrnos won the top prize with a walleye weighing in at 9.45 pounds.
Noah Moss of Aitkin, Minnesota, caught the 54-inch muskie Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2022, on Lake Plantagenet near Bemidji.
The Superior native died in 1956, but his writing still has a huge following.
Black Water Customs is named after Lake of the Woods, which is known for its stained, dark-colored water.