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What's Up Outdoors: A hunting tradition will continue after all

Outdoor hunting and fishing opportunities abound in Minnesota this fall, but it's off to Montana for me.

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It’s definitely that time of year when any outdoors person has too many choices.

The fishing has been great and the leaves are coming off so bow hunters and grouse hunters can see a little better. So, everyday you have to decide what to chase next.

Related: What’s Up Outdoors: This fall, the focus will be on Minnesota whitetails
I’ve been thinking about heading to the Rainy River for the fall walleye run, and even got the bow out thinking I would have some time to get in the deer stand.

But in an instant the boat will be going into storage and plans for the season have changed. The other day my phone dinged, like it does all day, but this email was one that I wasn’t expecting, but I sure was excited to get: Congratulations you’ve been chosen to receive a surplus big game tag in the state of Montana!

Now it’s a rush to get prepped for another solo hunt. I’m just so grateful I get the chance to continue the tradition, and the opportunity to try to fill another elk tag. With only two weeks I can truly say that I will not be as physically ready as I should be but mentally I’m already there. Now I just have to get all my work done before the trip and try not to think about it 24/7.

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Can’t wait to see that mountain sunrise, and hear the bugles as you try to sleep. The countdown is on.

JAMIE DIETMAN, What’s Up Outdoors, may be reached at 218-820-7757.

Dietman_Jamie.jpg
Jamie Dietman

Dietman_Jamie.jpg
Jamie Dietman

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