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What’s Up Outdoors: It’s time for deer camp

The main thing is that this weekend, a kid will get his first deer, a veteran hunter will get a buck for the wall and someone at deer camp will miss the big one. And that's what it's all about.

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Jamie Dietman
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It's that time of year again when the highways are filled with blaze orange hunters headed north. Some have hopes of finding that big buck and, for others, they just want to see a deer and spend some time in the woods.

No matter what kind of hunter you are, it's deer camp time! With the warm weather forecast my prediction is it's going to be a slow season, but that can change if we get some colder weather and the deer get moving.

Related: What’s Up Outdoors: Elk hunt starts off fall with a bang

Where we hunt I'm more concerned about the abundance of wolves rather than the weather, but another year has gone by without a wolf season so all I can do is shake my head.

Nowadays it's more about deer camp, tradition and seeing friends rather than getting too serious. Like many hunters now I save my high hopes for a good hunt for a trip out of state. It just seems that more and more hunters are heading in basically any direction to go hunt in a new area. Personally I love it out West, but many people I know love the big buck hunting in the states south of Minnesota. There are a lot of amazing places out there to try out.

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But no matter how much I like getting to new places you can bet that I'll be sitting in a tree Saturday hoping to see a deer! But the main thing is that this weekend, a kid will get his first deer, a veteran hunter will get a buck for the wall and someone at deer camp will miss the big one. And that's what it's all about.

Be safe out there everyone and good luck.

Related: What’s Up Outdoors: Scenery, friendship makes hunting trip worth it In one part the deer were on their feet all day but on land I couldn't hunt, in another part they were holding tight and very nocturnal.

JAMIE DIETMAN, What’s Up Outdoors, may be reached at 218-820-7757.
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