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Outdoor Notes for Sept. 24

DNR seeks designs for Minnesota's 2018 walleye stamp Artists can submit entries for the 2018 Minnesota Walleye Stamp from Monday, Oct. 9, through Friday, Oct. 20. The voluntary walleye stamp validation costs $5 but is not required to fish for or ...

DNR seeks designs for Minnesota's 2018 walleye stamp

Artists can submit entries for the 2018 Minnesota Walleye Stamp from Monday, Oct. 9, through Friday, Oct. 20.

The voluntary walleye stamp validation costs $5 but is not required to fish for or keep walleye. For an extra 75 cents, purchasers will be mailed the pictorial stamp. A pictorial collectable stamp without the validation is available for $5.75. Walleye stamps are available year-round and are not required to be purchased at the same time as fishing licenses.

"Walleye stamps help fund an account used only for walleye stocking," said Neil Vanderbosch, fisheries program consultant for the Department of Natural Resources. "We use the money to buy walleye from certified private producers that we stock in lakes."

The stamp contest offers no prizes and is open to Minnesota residents only. The walleye must be the primary focus of the design, though other fish species may be included in the design if they are used to depict common interaction between species or are common inhabitants of Minnesota lakes and rivers.

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Artists are not allowed to use any photographic, digital, or electronic imagery product as part of their finished entries. Winning artists usually issue limited edition prints of the artwork and retain proceeds. Judging will take place 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, at DNR Headquarters, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155.

Artists who want to submit entries should closely read contest criteria and guidelines for submitting work, available from the DNR Information Center, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155, by calling the Information Center at 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367, and online at mndnr.gov/stamps.

Whitefish-tullibee sport-netting to open on northern lakes

Recreational netting for whitefish-tullibee opens on Friday, Oct. 13, on designated lakes that are less susceptible to sudden changes that impact water temperature, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. A $10 license is needed to sport gillnet tullibee or whitefish. The season is open to Minnesota residents only.

These lakes, known as Schedule II lakes, offer recreational netting on the following schedule:

• Schedule II A lakes open Friday, Oct. 13, and close Sunday, Dec. 3.

• Schedule II B lakes open Friday, Nov. 3, and close Sunday, Dec. 10.

• Schedule II C lakes open Friday, Nov. 10, and close Sunday, Dec. 10.

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Schedule I Lakes, which are more susceptible to factors that impact water temperatures, will be opened and closed on a 48-hour notice posted at lake accesses, other public places, and the DNR website.

The DNR recommends drying nets for 10 days or freezing for two days before moving a net to a new lake, or netting only one lake in a season. Netting in infested waters may be restricted or closed to sport netting of whitefish and tullibee. See the fishing regulations for list of infested waters or online at mndnr.gov/invasives/ais/infested.html.

A complete list of all Schedule I and II lakes, status of the seasonal openings and closures, as well as detailed netting regulations are available online at mndnr.gov/regulations/fishing or by calling the DNR Information Center at 651-296-6157 in the Twin Cities or 888-646-6367 in greater Minnesota.

About 700 people obtain permits to net for whitefish-tullibee each year. The DNR bases netting schedules on expected water temperatures. As the water temperature cools, game fish head to deeper water and whitefish-tullibee come to shallow water for fall spawning. Netting is allowed when there is little chance that game fish populations would be negatively impacted by recreational netting in shallow water.

Minnesota law restricts the size of the net and its openings; requires that netting be done in water not deeper than 6 feet unless specifically authorized; stipulates that netted fish cannot be sold; and requires that any game fish caught must be immediately returned to the lake. State law also limits net size to 100 feet long and 3 feet deep; allows one person to use no more than one net; and forbids recreational netters from possessing angling equipment when netting whitefish-tullibee. Whitefish and tullibee harvested during the sport gillnetting season cannot be used for bait.

Teach a kid to hunt small game during Take a Kid Hunting Weekend

Frozen mid-step in the woods, trying to remain undetected in pursuit of squirrels or rabbits - while the pose may seem like yoga, it's often part of hunting small game.

Yet those careful and deliberate movements of yoga do have some parallels with how a hunter learns to move through the woods, and teaching the basics through small game hunting is the focus of Take a Kid Hunting Weekend this Saturday, Sept. 23, and Sunday, Sept. 24.

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During the weekend, adult Minnesota residents accompanied by a youth younger than age 16 can hunt small game without a license, but must comply with open seasons, limits and other regulations, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

"Small game hunting is an excellent way to introduce youth to hunting," said Mike Kurre, DNR mentoring program coordinator. "Starting out pursuing squirrels or rabbits builds essential skills used later on for hunting big game like deer. And for someone new to hunting, it can be a lot of fun."

Adults can help youth have a good experience by listening to what youth need, and together they can learn the lessons of the forests and fields, added Kurre.

"We encourage adults to keep on mentoring young hunters after this weekend concludes, because often that's what will keep them going back year after year," Kurre said.

For more information on small game hunting and hunting regulations, visit mndnr.gov/hunting/smallgame.

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