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DEREK CHAUVIN TRIAL

He achieved national recognition in 2021 for his help prosecuting former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin, highlighted by Blackwell delivering the state's opening statements and stirring rebuttal closing remarks before a jury found Chauvin guilty.
Chauvin's appeal to the Minnesota Court of Appeals came 90 days after his June 25 sentencing on the last day he could have done so, according to court documents. He was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.
Journee Howard, 25, believes she was chosen as a juror because she made it clear she had a neutral mindset. Though no one is completely unbiased, neutral and down the middle, Howard said, she is open-minded and doesn't lean far one way or the other politically.
Journee Howard is second juror to talk about trial

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The former Minneapolis Police officer was convicted of murder in April, a year after he kneeled on George Floyd's neck May 25, 2020, killing him outside a south Minneapolis convenience store. The incident, caught on video by a bystander, galvanized the U.S. police reform movement and set off a wave of protests.
The former Minneapolis Police officer was convicted of murder in April, a year after he kneeled on George Floyd's neck May 25, 2020, killing him outside a south Minneapolis convenience store. The incident, caught on video by a bystander, galvanized the U.S. police reform movement and set off a wave of protests.
Derek Chauvin was sentenced Friday, June 25, for the murder of George Floyd. Watch a stream here.
The sentencing of the former Minneapolis Police officer comes more than a year after he was filmed kneeling on Floyd's neck outside a south Minneapolis convenience store, setting off a wave of protests — some of which devolved into riots —and prompting nationwide calls for policing reform.
Journee Howard, 25, who put her modeling and acting studies on hold for the trial, is the second of the 12 jurors who deliberated to speak publicly since the verdicts were reached on April 20 in Hennepin County District Court. She said she was especially swayed by the detailed testimony of Dr. Martin Tobin, the lung specialist who bolstered the prosecution's contention that Floyd died from asphyxiation as a direct result of being pinned facedown by Chauvin and two other officers.
After he watched Derek Chauvin kneel on George Floyd’s neck for more than 9 minutes, prosecutor Jerry Blackwell felt it was his duty to raise his hand. His folksy way of talking through the evidence and bringing the humanity out of key witnesses resonated with jurors. Those who know him weren’t surprised. They knew his skill at setting a scene, connecting with jurors’ humanity and simplifying complex medical evidence.

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"With the verdict, there's a glimmer of hope." Paris Stevens was in a Minneapolis hotel ballroom with other relatives the day the verdict was read. An immense burden was lifted, Stevens said. It had been such a long journey.
Though it’s not referenced directly in the motion, one possible avenue for alleging juror misconduct could be reports that have surfaced recently about a juror who attended a rally in Washington, D.C., last summer.
Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on Tuesday, May 4, asked a Minneapolis judge for a new trial two weeks after he was found guilty in the killing of George Floyd.

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