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FLOODING

Businesses like Boone’s Market grocery store and community gathering places like St. James Catholic Church provided food and water to needy residents. Morrison County Sheriff Shawn Larsen said a man stopped by the Randall Fire Hall to offer a donation to support ongoing relief.
Earlier this month the flooding broke the lake's all-time record set in 1950, and it's only come down a few inches since.
The Mississippi River flows through Aitkin and Crow Wing counties, historically providing a means to transport goods but also is used for outdoor recreation in more recent times. The Mighty Mississippi has also flooded in years past, causing headaches and destruction.
It’s a mess, the result of a late snowmelt after a winter of heavy snow in the border country and record or near-record precipitation the past two months across the watershed.

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Flooding near Oslo, Minnesota, has destroyed agricultural land, washed out their township roads and caused thousands of dollars of damage to a railroad line that carries cars filled with wheat to the West Coast and southern United States.
The Rainy River watershed is overflowing from Lake Vermilion to Lake of the Woods, with flood records possible.
Ranier residents sandbagging homes and cabins as lakes and rivers flood over their banks.
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Strong to severe storms are likely this evening, starting in southwestern Minnesota, then spreading northeast across much of central and eastern Minnesota into western Wisconsin. Damaging wind gusts and large hail are the primary threats, though a few tornadoes cannot be ruled out.
West-central Minnesota was pounded by rain during intense thunderstorms Wednesday and Thursday, leading to flooded streets, basements, fields and parks.
“The rain events that used to occur every 50 or 100 hears are now happening every 10 years or even more frequently,” said Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Commissioner Katrina Kessler. “It’s not just once in your lifetime, it’s three or more times in one decade that you’re having to think about impacts on local resources as well as infrastructure and homes.”

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Lee Britt, a weather service meteorologist in Duluth, said rain was expected to begin Thursday afternoon, April 28, followed by a slow-moving low-pressure system creeping into the area Friday.

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